Artist Bio, Exhibitions, Uncategorized

Faultlines and Fractures

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Through the media of paint, glass and photography Rosie McClelland and Pamela Greene each explore the complex issue of identity. Recognising that identity has may facets and is subject to reinvention, their work explores the relationships we form with certain people, landscapes or objects and why these draw us close on emotional, spiritual or physical levels that we do not always understand. Drawn to the imperfections in the human condition and in nature, McClelland’s and Greene’s work recognises that it is in connecting with these fault lines that we find our DNA

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‘Little Blue’ oil on linen 50 x 40cm Rosie McClelland

The condition of self is transitory, never fixed. Our position within society, family and workplace can change radically throughout our lives. It is with this in mind that I approach my work which is first and foremost intimate and reflective, a personal response to my subject matter.

My chosen method of working is figurative, weaving underlying abstract forms into reality and, in the process, hopefully creating a sense of presence – a vibration. The study of the human body, an ongoing fascination throughout my life, returns time and again as does the art of still life which is about much more than the objects it portrays and more often than not represents human relationships. Another repeating motif is the tethered boat, so long a symbol of the spiritual, at times swaying on choppy seas, times on still waters portraying a reflection of the self.

Woven into this process is the acceptance of faults, fractures and imperfections as it is only through a holistic view of reality that the truth and the real self are revealed.                   Rosie McClelland

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Iceland Series ‘Frozen Sea’ dia 30cm depth 18cm Pamela Greene

Through the media of kiln-formed glass, photography and poetry I explore my primary interest, identity.   I am particularly drawn to the identity of landscape and why many of us make emotional or spiritual or physical connection with wild and inhospitable places whose beauty is often savage and transient.

My current work focuses on the landscapes of Iceland and Ireland, sustained sources of inspiration.   For my ‘Iceland’ series I chose to work with glass for its versatility: its ability – like ice – to transmit and reflect light, its reaction to fire, and, like the landscape of Iceland, its strength and vulnerability.  These properties make it the perfect medium to try to reflect the spirit of a landscape whose identity is shaped by ice and fire.

My glasswork is supported by photographs of Donegal, a landscape similar to that of Iceland.  In these I have sought to capture the essence of a fractured and fragmented landscape where it sometimes seems that the identity and history of our ancestors can be read in the faces and fault lines of the rock formations.

Working with glass and photography has enabled me to explore how landscape, actual and remembered, shapes our sense of who we are and where we come from.                            Pamela Greene

 

 

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Charcoal on watercolour paper Rosie McClelland

 On Saturday 12 Nov 2016 10am – 4pm, I shall be tutoring a life drawing workshop in the Island Arts Centre, Lisburn. Please contact the Island for details

 


 

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Donegal, Holiday, On Location, Sketching, Uncategorized

Donegal Sketching August 2016

Another long overdue blog!20160808_115644_resized

Monday August 8  – The deserted fishing village of Port was our first venue. A windswept but sunny day creating a continually changing light show….

       Tuesday August 9     Assaranca Waterfall and Ardara Town

 

Wednesday August 10 – A wet day so drawing exercises inside the cottage using Donegal’s wild flowers20160825_161811_resized

‘Losing control’- Sketching with charcoal taped onto the end of a paintbrush                   (left to right Margaret F, Kay McC, Karen W, Gavin H)

‘Large and Small Scale’ – drawing with a paintbrush and black ink on scrolled paper, pen and ink on small scale card. (left Kay McC, right Pamela G)

Subtraction drawings with charcoal and putty rubber.(left Pamela G, right Gavin H)

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Brambles (Margaret)

Thank you to all who took part!

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citysketching, Holiday, On Location, Sketching, Uncategorized, Workshops

Drawing in the City

DITC_2016_Vol1_53                                                       Pen and wash Rosie McClelland

This year, in May, I undertook a new, exciting venture. In conjunction with my talented daughter  Jessie ( www.jessicaweberphotography.com ) I led a tutored sketching/photography break in Berlin.

With a small, select group we took in the sights of that fascinating city, visiting locations such as the Eastside Gallery (old Berlin wall), the historical Oberbaumbrucke  to the beautiful Museuminsel, Gendarmenmarkt, Berlinerdom amongst many others,  sketching and taking photos on the way.

Included during the week were gallery visits, most noteworthy of which this year for me was the Erwin Wurm exhibition at the Berlinische Galerie.

Below are a few examples of work undertaken during the course but, for a fuller picture, head over to the Drawing in the City website www.drawinginthecity.com and have a peek.

Our next Berlin sketching break is May 2017

On Location, Uncategorized, Workshops

Sketching in Donegal August 2014

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Just a few images from this year’s sketching workshop in Donegal.

Eight painters took part over 4 days starting on the Sunday evening with a meal and a chance for everyone to get to know each other followed by a short talk on what to expect over the coming days.

The weather when I travelled down from Belfast on the Saturday was horrific. The rain was coming down in stair rods and Sunday wasn’t much better! Just as I was expecting to put plan B into operation, on Monday morning the sun came out and we were off to our first location, Maghera waterfall (above) and later across the dunes and down to the beach and caves (below)

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Making marks to convey the movement of the water and texture of the vegetation.

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Moving into colour and making colour notes

On Tuesday we travelled down to the very tip of St John’s Point for a panoramic view of the Sligo mountains across to Sliabh Liag.

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Tonal sketch capturing depth and atmospheric perspective

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Negative drawing of  ragwort

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Not a bad place to have a picnic!

The plan for the final day was to sketch around the Church graveyard and megalithic Ogham stone in Glencolumbcille, beautifully nestling in a valley surrounded by rolling hills. As we settled in to sketch and, in some cases, take rubbings from the ancient stones, the rain set in.

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Now, in my experience, rain in the hills doesn’t always mean rain elsewhere in Donegal so we set off for a favourite spot of mine- a peaceful little harbour on the coastal road between Kilcar and Carraig with a spot of retail therapy on the way at Glencolumbcille Woollen Mill and Kilcar’s Design Weaving Studio. Sure enough we managed to escape the rain here and spent a peaceful afternoon with nothing but the sound of lapping water and seagulls crying.

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Thank you to all who took part on the course you were amazing –

Brid, Margaret, Kay, Pamela, Karen, Sue, Mandy, Bernie.

Thank you Gerry (big sis) for all your help.

Thank you to Ethna at Inishduff House  who, as always, provided excellent hospitality and accommodation

Thank you for the good company and delicious food at Kitty Kelly’s

The images above are just a small example of the work produced and my apologies to those who had to leave early and whose work has not appeared here – I stupidly forgot to take photos before you left.

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Da dah!!

Uncategorized

Latest Portrait (Dr Ivan Pollock)

Just finished another commissioned portrait.

I took a few photos of the process and am sharing them here.

The first sitting is always scary –  exchanging a few awkward niceties with someone you have never met before and then starting to sketch them.

As if it isn’t bad enough sketching in front of people let alone someone who doesn’t know you!

At this stage it’s sometimes more about interacting with your subject and  the drawing is an analytical study more than creating a “likeness”. (just as well!)

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15 min charcoal line sketch

At the end of the sitting, a couple of nervous sketches and a batch of photos later I get to work on the next stage – tonal sketches and layouts for the final composition.

This is a head and shoulders commission so I worked to the same dimensions as the canvas itself.

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Looking at this now after several weeks more of studying the subject, I can’t believe how unobserved it was.

Below is a reworked study – much more satisfying!

Study for Dr Ivan Pollock Portrait 2

Willow charcoal on hot-pressed watercolour paper

However next stage is transferring the image to the canvas. I prefer to work on stretched linen for these portraits and I often start with a terre verte underpainting.

This is when I request a second sitting and, using raw umber and white , I start a tonal painting.

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Time for dabbing on some colour. Now the terre verte underpainting comes into play. The skin tones resonate immediately with the green contrast:-

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The subject was to be painted in his academic gown and hood and I felt these would work best with a dark background:-

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In the course of painting – studying the planes, lines and characteristics of the face I tend sometimes to over emphasise them creating an image which looks older than the subject really is so this is the point where another sitting is necessary to reduce this effect and check skin tones, hair and costume colours  – also realised I had major corrections to do around the mouth area :-

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Final stage – waiting for approval from the person who commissioned the painting – another scary moment but thankfully they liked it!

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Portrait of Dr Ivan Pollock

Headmaster of Campbell College Belfast 1987 – 2005